A TEMPLE FOR YOUR BODY

“They are architects of furniture who designed comfortable, livable pieces that define space in a dynamic way….They built temples for your body.”

David Jameson, Architect                                         

 

The above quote was in reference to Hans Wegner and Poul Kjaerholm, two remarkable furniture designers of the early twentieth century.

Think about it.

Imagine having a “temple for your body”.

I don’t know about you, but I think that sounds heavenly.

As I write this, I’m on a quest. I’m looking for comfortable furniture, specifically a perfect chair – one that will envelope my body and fit me like a glove.

I dream of a chair that will allow me to sit comfortably for hours on end, without having to constantly re-position my posterior for greater comfort.

Or squirm in my seat to keep from sliding off, because my feet don’t quite touch the floor.

Being ‘height challenged’ – seating of any kind is usually too deep. (Plus most countertops and upper cabinets are too high, but I digress).

In a typical day, we put our bodies through a lot of stress, from physical exercise, hours sitting at a computer, poor posture in general, and – oh,yes – carrying around excess weight.

Any one of these places extra stress on our muscles and joints.

It’s no wonder, then, that at the end of the day our tired, sore bodies are craving a comfortable place to rest.

A temple, so to speak.

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A TEMPLE FOR YOUR BODY

“They are architects of furniture who designed comfortable, livable pieces that define space in a dynamic way….They built temples for your body.”

David Jameson, Architect                    

The above quote was in reference to Hans Wegner and Poul Kjaerholm, two (among many) remarkable furniture designers of the early twentieth century.

Think about it.

Imagine having a “temple for your body”.

I don’t know about you, but I think that sounds heavenly.

As I write this, I’m on a quest. I’m looking for comfortable furniture, specifically a sofa that will envelope my body and fit me like a glove.

I dream of a sofa, or chair, that will allow me to sit comfortably for hours on end, without having to constantly re-position my posterior for greater comfort.

Or squirm in my seat to keep from sliding off, because my feet don’t quite touch the floor.

I happen to fit that segment of the population that is ‘height challenged’ – meaning I’m five feet, two inches in my stocking feet.

In a standard home such as my own, seating of any kind is usually too deep. (Plus most countertops and upper cabinets are too high, but I digress).

In a typical day, we put our bodies through a lot of stress, from physical exercise, hours sitting at a computer, poor posture in general, and – oh,yes – carrying around excess weight.

Any one of these places extra stress on our muscles and joints.

It’s no wonder, then, that at the end of the day our tired, sore bodies are craving a comfortable place to rest.

A temple, so to speak.

Our homes are meant to be a sanctuary. A place to escape the daily grind, to unwind and be with family, and to be our truest selves.

To truly be a sanctuary, your home must also meet your every need, including your personal comfort!

This means that the idea of ‘sanctuary’ must extend to the furnishings in your home!

Are you ready to create a temple for your body?

MY YEAR OF ‘INTERBEING’

“Everything is interconnected. Our body and our universe are one. This concept, what we call “interbeing” applies to everything.”

Thich Nhat Hanh

Three things happened to me recently.             

First, I came across this quote from Thich Nhat Hanh, about mindfulness and the body – what he refers to as “Interbeing”.

Then, I read this amazing article by Lisa Rough called “The Body Knows…”

OK, I thought. My body knows something. But what?

You see, I’d been feeling sorry for myself. For most of this year I’d been living with painful inflammation in my neck and shoulders.

My doctor said I had arthritis, which made me feel old, indeed.

I had months of physical therapy, took lots of Advil and had two cortisone shots. Nothing helped.

As if that wasn’t enough, I was experiencing sporadic bouts of vertigo and dizziness.

The dizziness didn’t go away.

That’s when I was referred to a vestibular therapist.

I can now toss around the word ‘vestibular’ with ease, although I will admit I had to hear it several times before the word finally sank in.

“A what?” was my initial reaction.

Most people say the same thing.

Suffice it to say that the vestibular system refers to the inner ear.

Along with our vision, and our muscles and joints, the vestibular system is what helps us maintain balance.

It’s all inter-related. (Isn’t everything?)

This is what Thich Nhat Hanh and Lisa were saying.

They were both correct.

While I’d known for some time that vertigo and motion sickness  (something that has plagued me since childhood) are closely related, I hadn’t realized the extent to which I was affected by it.

No one was more surprised than I, to learn that the problem I’d been battling the entire year, had to do with my inner ear.

One question still remained:  Why was my body hurting?

Well, as I mentioned, our muscles and joints also help us maintain balance. Seems mine were working extra hard. In fact, they were over-worked.

Even though I wasn’t feeling off-balance or out of alignment, my body knew something was up.

I realize this is a rather personal account about interbeing, and the connectiveness of all things. But it’s equally about what the body knows.

How about you?

Is your body trying to tell you something?

I sincerely hope you’re able to figure it out!